The planktonic larvae of most marine fish and invertebrates are microscopic, yet they have the potential to travel on ocean currents over distances far greater than propagules of most terrestrial organisms. How then does larval dispersal influence metapopulation structure across the vast ranges of many marine species? This question is central to modern marine biology. The answers can have significant consequences for our understanding of marine ecology, evolution, and conservation. My primary research goal is to better understand the ecological and evolutionary consequences of larval dispersal for marine populations and species. My approach is integrative: I employ probabilistic models to extract information from genetic data in the context of evidence from geology, remote

sensing, and biophysical models.


      I am now working at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in Santa Cruz, California, where I am using genetic methods to track the ocean distribution of Chinook salmon stocks, and employing next-generation sequencing methods to develop SNP assays for a variety of marine, anadromous and freshwater species.


    Throughout my career, I have been strongly engaged in science education and science communication. Public outreach and engagement is one of science’s fundamental responsibilities: its neglect is one of the causes of the current crisis in science education.


    Please visit my Research and Outreach & Education pages to learn more, and contact me using the information below:

 

Eric Crandall, PhD

Assistant Project Scientist

National Marine Fisheries Service

Southwest Fisheries Science Center

Fisheries Ecology Division

& University of California, Santa Cruz

110 Shaffer Road

Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA

Tel. 831-420-3959

eric.crandall(at)noaa.gov


Feb 26, 2014 - Please check out the new special issue on “The Molecular Ecology and Evolution of the Tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans” in the Bulletin of Marine Science, edited by myself and Dr. Cynthia Riginos. All articles are open-access! Click the word cloud to download an archive of all 22 articles.